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Carnivores: This group includes mammals with large canines and most have slicing cheek teeth (carnassials) which they use to hold and cut their food. Many carnivores are omnivorous rather than strictly meat eaters, and some eat mostly fruit. Members of the group include dogs, cats, kinkajous and otters.
Jaguar
Panthera onca Jaguar image
Makushi name: WayamaikÓ, Kaikusi
Creole name: Tiger, Pouss, Turtle Tiger
Size: body=1.25 m; tail=55 cm; weight=70 kg
Description: Very large and spotted; black spots forming open, broken circles, with a small central spot; heavy-set with a massive head and relatively short, thick legs. Tail shorter than hind limbs. This is the largest carnivore in Iwokrama. Eyeshine bright greenish-yellow.
Activity: Nocturnal and diurnal; mainly terrestrial, will climb low trees, and it swims well.
Habits: Solitary. It is sometimes seen walking along trails, road-sides, riversides, or other gaps at forest edge. Preys on large animals such as Capybara, peccaries, deer, and turtles. Most often silent, it occasionally roars or makes a loud series of grunts.
Habitat: Primary forest and forest edge.
Signs: Tracks, which are seen more often then the cat itself, are broad (in adults, 95 mm or more across), with four toes that have rounded toe pads, and no claw marks. The foot pad of the track is broad and rounded at the top (whereas it is indented at the top in Puma).
Status: Uncommon. Listed on CITES Appendix I. IUCN rank of Lower Risk.
Distribution in Iwokrama
Puma
Puma concolor Puma image
Makushi name: Sariwara, WaikinimÓ
Creole name: Deer Tiger
Size: body=1 m; tail=60 cm; weight=45 kg
Description: Large and slim-bodied, with long legs and long tail; upperparts sandy brown to deep red-brown, underparts cream to white. Head relatively small, with large pointed ears. Tail narrow, tipped black. Adult is only large unspotted cat in Iwokrama. Young is marked with brown spots. Eyeshine bright yellow.
Activity: Nocturnal and diurnal; mainly terrestrial but climbs well; seldom enters water.
Habits: Solitary and shy; seldom seen. It travels great distances, often along dirt roads or trails. The diet includes a variety of medium to large animal prey such as deer, Paca, and agouti. It may attack livestock if prey populations are reduced. Although usually silent, it may grunt, purr or yowl.
Habitat: All types of forest and open areas; prefers upland, rocky terrain and avoids marsh and wetland.
Signs: Tracks are often found on dirt roads or along trails; tracks are large (about 80 mm across), with four toe pads that taper almost to a point; top of the foot pad is indented (compare with rounded pad of Jaguar). Other signs include partially eaten kills covered with sticks, and scratches on fallen logs; sign may be stained with strong-smelling urine.
Status: Uncommon. Listed on CITES Appendix II.
Distribution in Iwokrama
Jaguarundi
Herpailurus yaguarondi Jaguarundi image
Makushi name: Waron, Kawai-yenpu
Creole name: Haka Tiger, Akuri Tiger
Size: body=75 cm; tail=50 cm; weight=7 kg
Description: Medium-sized with relatively short legs and elongated body; dark grey or reddish (a single litter may include both colour phases); grey animals are more common. Easily distinguished from other cats by long, low profile; long narrow tail distinguishes it from bushy-tailed Tayra. Eyeshine dull, reddish.
Activity: Mainly diurnal, occasionally active at night; it usually travels on the ground but can climb well.
Habits: This cat is more likely to be encountered than other species in Iwokrama. This is due in part to its diurnal habits, but also because it is not limited to forest, often entering grassy areas or clearings and crossing roads. It uses dens on the ground, in thickets or hollow logs. It usually eats small rodents and birds, but also takes insects or lizards on occasion, and may raid chicken coops. Calls are seldom heard in the wild; captives sometimes whistle, chirp, or churr.
Habitat: Found in a variety of habitats including forest, savannah, and cultivated areas, often near water. It favors dense brush and is less common in primary forest.
Signs: Four-toed tracks are about 40 mm wide, about the same size as those of Margay, but with narrower foot and toe pads (Margay tracks are less often encountered than those of Jaguarundi). Tracks may be found along roads or trails and in open areas.
Status: Uncommon. Listed on CITES Appendix II.
Distribution in Iwokrama

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