previous page next page

Olingo
Bassaricyon beddardi Olingo image
Size: body=40 cm; tail=40 cm; weight=1.5 kg
Description: Small and catlike, with a long, slightly bushy tail. Body grey-brown to yellowish, head usually grey; underparts paler. Tail not prehensile, marked with very faint bands. Ears short and rounded. Easily confused with Kinkajou, which is larger and has a tapering, prehensile tail and a broader muzzle. Eyeshine bright orange.
Activity: Nocturnal and arboreal, seldom descends to the ground. Agile and fast-moving.
Habits: This small relative of the raccoon is usually solitary, but several individuals may feed together in a fruiting tree. If caught in a spotlight it usually runs off, moving quickly through the branches with its tail held straight out or raised up. It rests in the day on branches or in holes in trees. It eats a variety of fruits, nectar, invertebrates, and small vertebrates. It is usually silent, but sometimes makes a two-note alarm call "whey-chuck, whey-chuck," slower and lower in pitch than that of the Kinkajou. Other calls include sneezes and growls.
Habitat: Usually found in undisturbed evergreen forest, occasionally in second growth or at forest edge.
Signs: Tracks are five-toed with claw marks close to the toe pads, about 30 to 35 mm wide. Tracks are seldom seen due to arboreal habits.
Status: Rare. IUCN rank of Lower Risk.
Distribution in Iwokrama
Kinkajou
Potos flavus Kinkajou image
Makushi name: Kuikui
Creole name: Honey Bear, Night Monkey
Size: body=55 cm; tail=50 cm; weight=3 kg
Description: Medium sized carnivore, with some resemblance to a monkey or long-tailed bear. Golden-brown above, cream or yellow below; tail prehensile, tapering to a dark tip that is usually wrapped around a branch. Face short and broad with widely spaced, rounded ears and large eyes. Easily confused with Olingo which has a non-tapered, nonprehensile tail and a grey head. Eyeshine bright orange.
Activity: Nocturnal and arboreal, seldom descends to the ground.
Habits: Usually solitary but sometimes in small groups. It may feed in the same tree with Olingos or opossums. The Kinkajou is less active than the Olingo, and is one of the most often seen nocturnal arboreal mammals. It can be located by sounds of falling leaves as it moves noisily through the trees; when caught in a light it often remains motionless for several minutes. During the day it rests in tree hollows or on branches. The diet is mainly fruit, supplemented with nectar, insects (including ants), and small vertebrates such as mice and bats. It can sometimes be located by calls, including a short, barking "wick-wick-wick," or a low moaning cry.
Habitat: Common in all types of forest, also found in second growth and agricultural areas with sufficient trees.
Signs: Tracks are five-toed, about 40 mm wide, with large foot pads and claw marks close to the toe pads; tracks seldom encountered due to arboreal habits (but more common than those of Olingos).
Status: Common.
Distribution in Iwokrama
Coati
Nasua nasua Coati image
Makushi name: Kuwasi
Creole name: Kibi-hee
Size: body=55 cm; tail=55 cm; weight=4.5 kg
Description: A long-nosed relative of the raccoon with a long tail often held straight up. Body colour varies from orange-brown to dark brown; belly pale yellow. Legs rather short; long strong claws on front feet. Face brown with white spots on cheeks and around eyes; ears short and rounded. Tail bushy at base, faintly to strongly banded. Eyeshine whitish.
Activity: Diurnal; terrestrial and arboreal.
Habits: At a distance one may see nothing more than several erect, slowly waving tails as a group of coatis forage on the ground. Groups numbering up to 60 consist of females and their young; males are solitary except during the breeding season. This species climbs well and may feed on fruit in the canopy, or rest on branches during the day and at night, but it also feeds and travels on the ground, digging through the leaf litter and under logs for tubers and invertebrates. Small vertebrates are also taken. When disturbed, one member of the group will bark and the rest of the group will flee, climbing up to a safe vantage. Chitters, squeals and soft calls are also given.
Habitat: All forest types, second growth, and scrub.
Signs: Tracks are five-toed, about 45 mm wide, with large foot pads and long claws well-spaced from toe pads. Shallow digging over a wide area and disturbance of the leaf litter indicate the recent activity of a group of coatis.
Status: Locally common, especially if not hunted.

previous page next page



[ Iwokrama Home page ] [ Iwokrama Guides ] [ Mammals of Iwokrama ]

© 1999 Iwokrama International Centre for Rain Forest Conservation and Development